Tuesday, March 3, 2009

Terror threat? Or nothing at all.

Better safe than sorry, so I join Gabu mabu in asking "What does this mean?"

...Machen Sie es bitte nicht billig. Sie können überzeugt sein, dass die wahren Lügner und Verleumder die Herrn Professor EL Naschie auf Befehl angegriffen und jede noch so niederträchtigen Mittel benutzt haben sehr bald in München, Hamburg und London gebührender Halt geboten wird.


Of course I ran it through a machine and got

Make it please not cheap. They can be convinced that the true liars and slanderer attacked the Mr. professor EL Naschie on instruction and each still so mean means used very soon in Munich, Hamburg and London being entitled stop are ordered.


Which is pretty meaningless, but I don't like the tone. Perhaps some of our native German speakers can tell us

  • what it means; or -- if it's meaningless --

  • what was the author trying to say, and

  • was the author a native German speaker, and if not

  • are there any linguistic clues as to their native tongue?

  • Is this something to worry about?


Please put any insights in the comments. Thanks!
Translate English to Arabic


محمد النشائي El Naschie Watch محمد النشائي El Naschie News محمد النشائي
محمد النشائي All El Naschie All The Time محمد النشائي

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8 comments:

  1. ...Machen Sie es bitte nicht billig. Sie können überzeugt sein, dass die wahren Lügner und Verleumder die Herrn Professor EL Naschie auf Befehl angegriffen und jede noch so niederträchtigen Mittel benutzt haben sehr bald in München, Hamburg und London gebührender Halt geboten wird.

    Don't do it cheaply. You can be convinced that the true liars and slanderers, who attacked Prof. EN on command and who used lowly means, will very soon be stopped in Munich, Hamburg and London.

    Contains one minor grammatical mistake.

    Klausi

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you, Klausi. Makes sense now. Replacing "convinced" with "sure" makes it perfect idomatic English, even.

    Note that two of the three cities are known Howrey offices. "Don't do it cheaply" could mean to use expensive lawyers. Perhaps the El Naschie detractors would be "stopped" with law suits.

    The cities could also be publishing bases of El Naschie-critical periodicals etc...?

    I'm satisfied that it's not a terrorist threat.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Where are you from, Klausi? I'm German, and "gebührender Halt geboten wird" doesn't sound anything like familiar or normal to me. Is this maybe Austrian? Or specific for a region in Germany? That could of course be. And what is after the sentence may be grammatically correct the meaning? The slanderers will be stopped in three cities? His "slanderers" come from all over the world! His main enemy seems to come from the arabic area.

    ReplyDelete
  4. El Naschie Threat ProfilerMarch 4, 2009 at 1:44 AM

    Try googling "gebührender halt" (with quotes) and you will find one (in words: 1) hit. It is a google whack! And Klausi, what about the "gebührend"? It means "appropriate" or "as deserved". You didn't translate it.
    Google "gebührenden halt" and you will find only uses where the "halt" means support/comfort/footing/ground or taking a rest/have a break. What you mean would be "Einhalt" and that is restriction, to curb or arrest. And even "gebührenden Einhalt bieten" sounds very strange to me and I have difficulties to imagine what that could mean.

    ReplyDelete
  5. In idiomatic English, taking the above comments into account: "Don't do it cheaply. You can be sure that the true liars and slanderers who attacked Prof. El Naschie on command, and who used lowly means, will very soon deservedly be stopped in Munich, Hamburg and London."

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hamburg is the city where the ZEIT appears.
    The german expressions (like "gebührender Halt") sound somehow old-fashioned and complicated, but I would expect the writer to be a (probably elder) native speaker.

    ReplyDelete
  7. The grammar is sloppy (it should read: den wahren Lügnern und Verleumdern), and commas are missing. I guess someone only pretending speaking German, or trying to impress by a pretentious use of language. Quite sure not an elder German native speaker.

    ReplyDelete
  8. That was my first impression, too. Maybe not an elder German native speaker but somebody who was living in Germany for some years some fifty/sixty years ago, received his education here and didn't keep up with the language since he left Germany.

    ReplyDelete