Thursday, September 9, 2010

Fabien Besnard on Ahmad Rami El-Nabulsi

Fabien Besnard is the proprietor of the Mathéphysique blog. He sometimes writes reviews of noncommutative geometry papers for Mathematical Reviews. As you will see, he is also a defender of science. Besnard sent a very interesting email to me, Peter Woit, and John Baez.


Besnard was called upon to review the paper shown below.

Complexified fractional heat kernel and physics beyond the spectral triplet action in noncommutative geometry

And here is his review.

Review of El-Nabulsi paper by Fabien Besnard

Besnard pointed out a couple of blatant errors, not deeming it worthwhile to belabor in detail such tripe, and didn't give it much more thought.

I notice that the paper cites E-infinity group member Ervin Goldfain three times, which by itself is cause for suspicion.

Very recently Besnard received another paper (see below) by El-Nabulsi. This new paper cites El Naschie's E-infinity theory as a motivation for the work, and since Besnard is on the ball, this raised a red flag for him. El-Nabulsi, Besnard notes, has published in all these journals:

  • Int. J. Geom. Meth. Mod. Phys.
  • Int. J. Mod Phys, Comm. Theor. Phys.
  • Mod. Phys. Lett. B
  • Journal of Mathematical Physics
  • Chaos, Solitons and Fractals


A man after our own heart, Besnard is writing to their editorial boards! He promises to keep us posted.

Peter Woit warned him of El Naschie's litigiousness, and I told him not to worry because El Naschie hasn't been known to sue bloggers.

UPDATE: A reader quotes from Nature, 6 November 2003, http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v426/n6962/full/426007a.html (subscription required) these paragraphs about someone called "Ramy Naboulsi" who I suspect is the same person as Rami El-Nabulsi:

The plagiarism case traces its origins to June 2002, when Yasushi Watanabe, a high-energy physicist at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, was contacted by Ramy Naboulsi, who said he was a mathematical physicist. Naboulsi asked for Watanabe's help in obtaining a research position in Japan. Impressed by Naboulsi's work, Watanabe agreed to upload some of his papers to ArXiv, which Naboulsi was unable to do himself as he had no academic affiliation. "I was so amazed at his productivity I began to think he was a genius," Watanabe later wrote in an e-mail to the archive.

By April 2003, Naboulsi had 22 papers on ArXiv, but some of server's users noticed that one of his papers copied parts of the BaBar Physics Book, an online summary of meetings about a high-energy physics experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. When six more of the papers were shown to be similar to the BaBar book, Watanabe asked for all 22 preprints to be withdrawn. ArXiv labelled the papers as such but left them on the site, in accordance with its policy.

When contacted by Nature, Naboulsi said that he would like to apologize to ArXiv and to the Stanford centre, but said that his other papers, on cosmology, were not plagiarized.


Interesting!

UPDATE: Fabien Besnard, in his comment below, wishes I had waited until he heard back from the editorial boards, so I apologize for jumping the gun.

A reader confirms in a comment that Ramy Naboulsi and Ahmad Rami El-Nabulsi are the same person. He writes:

Yes, it's the same Nabulsi.
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/spires/find/hep/www?rawcmd=FIND+A+EL-NABULSI&FORMAT=WWW&SEQUENCE=
shows 43 articles starting in 2005, including 12 so far in 2010. But he's still employing the same methodology (which is why he hasn't deposited them on arXiv). The reason the articles are incoherent is they're pieced together from other sources, so you can tell Besnard that he should also warn editors they're dealing with a known plagiarist.


He notes that the Nabulsi paper Charged Randall–Sundrum Braneworld Type II with Higher Order Curvature Corrections from Superstring Arguments and Dominated by Quintessence, Commun. Theor. Phys. (Beijing, China) 53 (2010) pp. 869–881 and a paper by Kazuya Koyama from three years earlier, The cosmological constant and dark energy in braneworlds, Gen. Rel. Grav., Vol. 40, 421-450 (2008) DOI: 10.1007/s10714-007-0552-x (PDF. Also on arXiv) contain nearly identical passges

Despite the remarkably simple setup of the model, gravity dynamical equations are extremely complicated. Fortunately, for a homogeneous and isotropic brane, the generalized Birkhoff theorem ensures that the bulk space-time is AdS spacetime or AdS-Schwarzschild spacetime. The Friedmann equation on the brane and the scalar field wave equation are derived as


and

Despite the remarkably simple setup of the model, gravity in this model is incredibly complicated. Fortunately, for a homogeneous and isotropic brane, the generalized Birkoff theorem ensures that the bulk spacetime is AdS spacetime or AdS-Schwarzchild spacetime. Then the Friedmann equation on the brane is easily derived as


respectively. Busted!

El-Nabulsi's new paper is Fractional Dirac Operators and Left-Right fractional Chamseddine-Connes spectral bosonic action principle in noncommutative geometry, International Journal of Geometric Methods in Modern Physics, Vol. 7, No 1 (2010) pp. 95-134. Here is Besnard's review.

Fabien Besnard's review of a Ahmad Rami El-Nabulsi paper

UPDATE: See Besnard gets five replies from thirteen journals.

Translate English to Arabic
محمد النشائى El Naschie Watch محمد النشائي El Naschie News محمد النشائى محمد النشائي All El Naschie All The Time محمد النشائى
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33 comments:

  1. The names are similar, is "Ahmad Rami El-Nabulsi" the same as the "Ramy Naboulsi" mentioned here:

    http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v426/n6962/full/426007a.html
    Nature, 6 November 2003:

    "The plagiarism case traces its origins to June 2002, when Yasushi Watanabe, a high-energy physicist at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, was contacted by Ramy Naboulsi, who said he was a mathematical physicist. Naboulsi asked for Watanabe's help in obtaining a research position in Japan. Impressed by Naboulsi's work, Watanabe agreed to upload some of his papers to ArXiv, which Naboulsi was unable to do himself as he had no academic affiliation. "I was so amazed at his productivity I began to think he was a genius," Watanabe later wrote in an e-mail to the archive.

    By April 2003, Naboulsi had 22 papers on ArXiv, but some of server's users noticed that one of his papers copied parts of the BaBar Physics Book, an online summary of meetings about a high-energy physics experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. When six more of the papers were shown to be similar to the BaBar book, Watanabe asked for all 22 preprints to be withdrawn. ArXiv labelled the papers as such but left them on the site, in accordance with its policy.

    When contacted by Nature, Naboulsi said that he would like to apologize to ArXiv and to the Stanford centre, but said that his other papers, on cosmology, were not plagiarized."

    ReplyDelete
  2. Great find, especially since the spelling is different! I bet it's the same guy. Thank you for the quoted paragraphs -- I am not a subscriber and could not have read it otherwise. I will add this information to the post.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Jason, I would have liked you to wait for me to contact the journals before publishing this. I think that the editorial boards deserved to be informed before the affair is made public.

    Anyway, what is done is done, but I would like to stress what is a very important point for me: what is at stake here is not the behaviour of an individual, but the misfunction of the refereeing system. My wish is that this system be improved. I would be glad if everyone could stay focused on this objective, and avoid turning anyone, however unethical his behaviour might have been, into a scapegoat.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Yes, it's the same Nabulsi.
    http://www.slac.stanford.edu/spires/find/hep/www?rawcmd=FIND+A+EL-NABULSI&FORMAT=WWW&SEQUENCE=
    shows 43 articles starting in 2005, including 12 so far in 2010.
    But he's still employing the same methodology (which is why he hasn't deposited them on arXiv). The reason the articles are incoherent is they're pieced together from other sources, so you can tell Besnard that he should also warn editors they're dealing with a known plagiarist.

    Here's a sample of the methodology (via simple google search on sentences from text):

    Charged Randall–Sundrum Braneworld Type II with Higher Order Curvature Corrections from Superstring Arguments and Dominated by Quintessence, by El-Nabulsi
    Commun. Theor. Phys. (Beijing, China) 53 (2010) pp. 869–881
    http://iopscience.iop.org/0253-6102/53/5/16/pdf/0253-6102_53_5_16.pdf

    "Despite the remarkably simple setup of the model, gravity dynamical equations are extremely complicated. Fortunately, for a homogeneous and isotropic brane, the generalized Birkhoff theorem ensures that the bulk space-time is AdS spacetime or AdS-Schwarzschild spacetime. The Friedmann equation on the brane and the scalar field wave equation are derived as"

    From three years earlier, by Kazuya Koyama
    The cosmological constant and dark energy in braneworlds,
    http://arxiv.org/pdf/0706.1557 and published as
    Gen.Rel.Grav., Vol. 40, 421-450 (2008) DOI: 10.1007/s10714-007-0552-x
    www.springerlink.com/index/d2l8v03772450154.pdf

    "Despite the remarkably simple setup of the model, gravity in this model is incredibly complicated. Fortunately, for a homogeneous and isotropic brane, the generalized Birkoff theorem ensures that the bulk spacetime is AdS spacetime or AdS-Schwarzchild spacetime. Then the Friedmann equation on the brane is easily derived as"

    ReplyDelete
  5. Post has been updated.

    ReplyDelete
  6. > so I apologize for jumping the gun.

    Jumped guns here a regular occurrence

    > ... contain identical passages

    Actually they're not identical, part of the point: note the light editing of first and last sentences in the excerpt. But this still misses the larger point: that excerpt is not the result of exhaustive search. Plug in part of the text from virtually any paragraph of any of El-Nabulsi's 43 articles since 2005 and you will find an approximate match from an earlier article by someone else. It is the plagiarist mix-and-match methodology so common among the current generation of plagiarists.

    But all this is only tangentially related to El Naschie. The lesson El-Nabulsi learned in 2003 was to avoid detection in the short-term by copying from more obscure sources and relying on the original authors not seeing his output. So he effectively learned in part to plagiarize from articles that cite El Naschie because
    a) no one reads such articles
    b) authors of such articles don't read other articles

    It is also not all that surprising that there are fringe journals that publish the incoherent mix-and-match result, but there is also a handful of his 43 recent in legitimate journals, also plagiarized, and whose editors should likely be notified. The twelve so far in 2010 means he has grown brazen enough to step up his output. (In that regard alone he is a kindred spirit to El N, but will never become his own journal editor.) His articles claim affiliation to Cheju National University in South Korea, but that University website has no mention of him. It is also scandalous that he has attended many conferences as a "student" -- it is difficult for conference organizers to screen for people without actual academic training who are able to pretend academic background with a cv full of plagiarized nonsense published in fringe venues.

    ReplyDelete
  7. This comment still shows up on the list of Recent Comments:
    http://elnaschiewatch.blogspot.com/2010/09/fabien-besnard-on-ahmad-rami-el-nabulsi.html?showComment=1284170334088#comment-c2049680739439856193

    But it was removed. Why?

    ReplyDelete
  8. The recent comments widget often doesn't sync properly with the actual comments. Fortunately it usually fixes itself when one or two new comments are posted. If you are concerned that a comment has gone missing, feel free to re-post it.

    ReplyDelete
  9. > contain identical passages

    Actually part of the point is that they're not identical, note the light editing of first and last sentences. But this misses the broader point anyway: search google for a text fragment from virtually any paragraph of any of El-Nabulsi's 43 articles since 2005 and you'll find the paragraph from elsewhere from which it was lifted. This mix-and-match methodology is common among the current generation of plagiarists.

    But all this has little to do with El Naschie. The lesson that El-Nabulsi learned since 2003 was to try to avoid detection by readers or the original authors by staying in obscure venues. So he effectively learned to copy in part from articles that refer to El Naschie because:
    a) nobody reads those articles
    b) authors of those articles don't read other articles
    This works in the short-term, but of course he ignores the existence of full-text search engines in the long term.

    It is also not surprising that there are fringe journals where such incoherent mix-and-match articles slip through referees and editors. But there is also a handful of legitimate journals in the publication list, with texts easily confirmed to be plagiarized, so those journal editors should be notified.

    12 in the past year mean he is stepping up his output and getting more brazen (in that regard he is similar to the primary El N, but unlikely to become his own journal editor). In his articles he claims affiliation to Cheju National University, South Korea, but he is not mentioned anywhere on the website of that University, so that may be exaggerated or fabricated (another El N calling card). It is scandalous that he shows up as having attended various conferences and schools as a student in the past few years, but the organizers are not set up to detect people with pretend credentials and plagiarized publication records.

    > jumped the gun

    A semi-regular occurrence

    ReplyDelete
  10. > contain identical passages

    Actually part of the point is that they're not identical, note the light editing of first and last sentences. But this misses the broader point anyway: search google for a text fragment from virtually any paragraph of any of El-Nabulsi's 43 articles since 2005 and you'll find the paragraph from elsewhere from which it was lifted. This mix-and-match methodology is common among the current generation of plagiarists.

    But all this has little to do with El Naschie. The lesson that El-Nabulsi learned since 2003 was to try to avoid detection by readers or the original authors by staying in obscure venues. So he effectively learned to copy in part from articles that refer to El Naschie because:
    a) nobody reads those articles
    b) authors of those articles don't read other articles
    This works in the short-term, but of course he ignores the existence of full-text search engines in the long term.

    It is also not surprising that there are fringe journals where such incoherent mix-and-match articles slip through referees and editors. But there is also a handful of legitimate journals in the publication list, with texts easily confirmed to be plagiarized, so those journal editors should be notified.

    12 in the past year mean he is stepping up his output and getting more brazen (in that regard he is similar to the primary El N, but unlikely to become his own journal editor). In his articles he claims affiliation to Cheju National University, South Korea, but he is not mentioned anywhere on the website of that University, so that may be exaggerated or fabricated (another El N calling card). It is scandalous that he shows up as having attended various conferences and schools as a student in the past few years, but the organizers are not set up to detect people with pretend credentials and plagiarized publication records.

    > jumped the gun

    A semi-regular occurrence

    ReplyDelete
  11. > contain identical passages

    Actually part of the point is that they're not identical, note the light editing of first and last sentences. But this misses the broader point anyway: search google for a text fragment from virtually any paragraph of any of El-Nabulsi's 43 articles since 2005 and you'll find the paragraph from elsewhere from which it was lifted. This mix-and-match methodology is common among the current generation of plagiarists.

    But all this has little to do with El Naschie. The lesson that El-Nabulsi learned since 2003 was to try to avoid detection by readers or the original authors by staying in obscure venues. So he effectively learned to copy in part from articles that refer to El Naschie because:
    a) nobody reads those articles
    b) authors of those articles don't read other articles
    This works in the short-term, but of course he ignores the existence of full-text search engines in the long term.

    It is also not surprising that there are fringe journals where such incoherent mix-and-match articles slip through referees and editors. But there is also a handful of legitimate journals in the publication list, with texts easily confirmed to be plagiarized, so those journal editors should be notified.

    12 in the past year mean he is stepping up his output and getting more brazen (in that regard he is similar to the primary El N, but unlikely to become his own journal editor). In his articles he claims affiliation to Cheju National University, South Korea, but he is not mentioned anywhere on the website of that University, so that may be exaggerated or fabricated (another El N calling card). It is scandalous that he shows up as having attended various conferences and schools as a student in the past few years, but the organizers are not set up to detect people with pretend credentials and plagiarized publication records.

    ReplyDelete
  12. > jumped the gun

    A semi-regular occurrence

    ReplyDelete
  13. The follow-up comment on El-Nabulsi was instantly removed three times in a row. Perhaps it is unintentionally triggering some spam filter and you can restore it.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I am at a loss to explain the triple disappearance. There is no spam filter and comments are unmoderated. Perhaps you can email me the comment and I can try posting it.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I will repost the short message in three parts, to see which is causing the bounce. Part I:


    > contain identical passages

    Actually part of the point is that they're not identical, note the light editing of first and last sentences. But this misses the broader point anyway: search google for a text fragment from virtually any paragraph of any of El-Nabulsi's 43 articles since 2005 and you'll find the paragraph from elsewhere from which it was lifted. This mix-and-match methodology is common among the current generation of plagiarists.

    ReplyDelete
  16. By experimentation it seems the offending text was a perfectly well formatted blogspot.com link, it would show up in the widget, but then otherwise disappear. Here's a retry with the same link in plain text:

    > contain identical passages

    Actually part of the point is that they're not identical, note the light editing of first and last sentences. But this misses the broader point anyway: search google for a text fragment from virtually any paragraph of any of El-Nabulsi's 43 articles since 2005 and you'll find the paragraph from elsewhere from which it was lifted. This mix-and-match methodology is common among the current generation of plagiarists (see http://plagiarism-main.blogspot.com/ ).

    But all this has little to do with El Naschie. The lesson that El-Nabulsi learned since 2003 was to try to avoid detection by readers or the original authors by staying in obscure venues. So he effectively learned to copy in part from articles that refer to El Naschie because:
    a) nobody reads those articles
    b) authors of those articles don't read other articles
    This works in the short-term, but of course he ignores the existence of full-text search engines in the long term.

    It is also not surprising that there are fringe journals where such incoherent mix-and-match articles slip through referees and editors. But there is also a handful of legitimate journals in the publication list, with texts easily confirmed to be plagiarized, so those journal editors should be notified.

    12 in the past year mean he is stepping up his output and getting more brazen (in that regard he is similar to the primary El N, but unlikely to become his own journal editor). In his articles he claims affiliation to Cheju National University, South Korea, but he is not mentioned anywhere on the website of that University, so that may be exaggerated or fabricated (another El N calling card). It is scandalous that he shows up as having attended various conferences and schools as a student in the past few years, but the organizers are not set up to detect people with pretend credentials and plagiarized publication records.

    > jumped the gun

    A semi-regular occurrence

    ReplyDelete
  17. By experimentation it seems the offending text was a perfectly well formatted blogspot.com link, it would show up in the widget, but then otherwise disappear. Here's a retry with the same link in plain text:

    > contain identical passages

    Actually part of the point is that they're not identical, note the light editing of first and last sentences. But this misses the broader point anyway: search google for a text fragment from virtually any paragraph of any of El-Nabulsi's 43 articles since 2005 and you'll find the paragraph from elsewhere from which it was lifted. This mix-and-match methodology is common among the current generation of plagiarists (see http://plagiarism-main.blogspot.com/ ).

    But all this has little to do with El Naschie. The lesson that El-Nabulsi learned since 2003 was to try to avoid detection by readers or the original authors by staying in obscure venues. So he effectively learned to copy in part from articles that refer to El Naschie because:
    a) nobody reads those articles
    b) authors of those articles don't read other articles
    This works in the short-term, but of course he ignores the existence of full-text search engines in the long term.

    It is also not surprising that there are fringe journals where such incoherent mix-and-match articles slip through referees and editors. But there is also a handful of legitimate journals in the publication list, with texts easily confirmed to be plagiarized, so those journal editors should be notified.

    12 in the past year mean he is stepping up his output and getting more brazen (in that regard he is similar to the primary El N, but unlikely to become his own journal editor). In his articles he claims affiliation to Cheju National University, South Korea, but he is not mentioned anywhere on the website of that University, so that may be exaggerated or fabricated (another El N calling card). It is scandalous that he shows up as having attended various conferences and schools as a student in the past few years, but the organizers are not set up to detect people with pretend credentials and plagiarized publication records.

    ReplyDelete
  18. > contain identical passages

    Actually part of the point is that they're not identical, note the light editing of first and last sentences. But this misses the broader point anyway: search google for a text fragment from virtually any paragraph of any of El-Nabulsi's 43 articles since 2005 and you'll find the paragraph from elsewhere from which it was lifted. This mix-and-match methodology is common among the current generation of plagiarists
    (see plagiarism-main.blogspot.com )

    But all this has little to do with El Naschie. The lesson that El-Nabulsi learned since 2003 was to try to avoid detection by readers or the original authors by staying in obscure venues. So he effectively learned to copy in part from articles that refer to El Naschie because:
    a) nobody reads those articles
    b) authors of those articles don't read other articles
    This works in the short-term, but of course he ignores the existence of full-text search engines in the long term.

    It is also not surprising that there are fringe journals where such incoherent mix-and-match articles slip through referees and editors. But there is also a handful of legitimate journals in the publication list, with texts easily confirmed to be plagiarized, so those journal editors should be notified.

    12 in the past year mean he is stepping up his output and getting more brazen (in that regard he is similar to the primary El N, but unlikely to become his own journal editor). In his articles he claims affiliation to Cheju National University, South Korea, but he is not mentioned anywhere on the website of that University, so that may be exaggerated or fabricated (another El N calling card). It is scandalous that he shows up as having attended various conferences and schools as a student in the past few years, but the organizers are not set up to detect people with pretend credentials and plagiarized publication records.

    ReplyDelete
  19. In the visitors log I do see what look like repeated attempts to post a comment; but sure enough, no comment appears. A mystery.

    ReplyDelete
  20. (seems to get deleted due to well-formed blogspot.com link, trying again):

    > contain identical passages

    Actually part of the point is that they're not identical, note the light editing of first and last sentences. But this misses the broader point anyway: search google for a text fragment from virtually any paragraph of any of El-Nabulsi's 43 articles since 2005 and you'll find the paragraph from elsewhere from which it was lifted. This mix-and-match methodology is common among the current generation of plagiarists
    (see plagiarism-main . blogspot . com )

    But all this has little to do with El Naschie. The lesson that El-Nabulsi learned since 2003 was to try to avoid detection by readers or the original authors by staying in obscure venues. So he effectively learned to copy in part from articles that refer to El Naschie because:
    a) nobody reads those articles
    b) authors of those articles don't read other articles
    This works in the short-term, but of course he ignores the existence of full-text search engines in the long term.

    It is also not surprising that there are fringe journals where such incoherent mix-and-match articles slip through referees and editors. But there is also a handful of legitimate journals in the publication list, with texts easily confirmed to be plagiarized, so those journal editors should be notified.

    12 in the past year mean he is stepping up his output and getting more brazen (in that regard he is similar to the primary El N, but unlikely to become his own journal editor). In his articles he claims affiliation to Cheju National University, South Korea, but he is not mentioned anywhere on the website of that University, so that may be exaggerated or fabricated (another El N calling card). It is scandalous that he shows up as having attended various conferences and schools as a student in the past few years, but the organizers are not set up to detect people with pretend credentials and plagiarized publication records.

    ReplyDelete
  21. > contain identical passages

    Actually part of the point is that they're not identical, note the light editing of first and last sentences. But this misses the broader point anyway: search google for a text fragment from virtually any paragraph of any of El-Nabulsi's 43 articles since 2005 and you'll find the paragraph from elsewhere from which it was lifted. This mix-and-match methodology is common among the current generation of plagiarists.

    But all this has little to do with El Naschie. The lesson that El-Nabulsi learned since 2003 was to try to avoid detection by readers or the original authors by staying in obscure venues. So he effectively learned to copy in part from articles that refer to El Naschie because:
    a) nobody reads those articles
    b) authors of those articles don't read other articles
    This works in the short-term, but of course he ignores the existence of full-text search engines in the long term.

    It is also not surprising that there are fringe journals where such incoherent mix-and-match articles slip through referees and editors. But there is also a handful of legitimate journals in the publication list, with texts easily confirmed to be plagiarized, so those journal editors should be notified.

    12 in the past year mean he is stepping up his output and getting more brazen (in that regard he is similar to the primary El N, but unlikely to become his own journal editor). In his articles he claims affiliation to Cheju National University, South Korea, but he is not mentioned anywhere on the website of that University, so that may be exaggerated or fabricated (another El N calling card). It is scandalous that he shows up as having attended various conferences and schools as a student in the past few years, but the organizers are not set up to detect people with pretend credentials and plagiarized publication records.

    ReplyDelete
  22. > ... contain identical passages

    Actually part of the point is that they're not identical, note the light editing of first and last sentences. But this misses the broader point anyway: search google for a text fragment from virtually any paragraph of any of El-Nabulsi's 43 articles since 2005 and you'll find the paragraph from elsewhere from which it was lifted. This mix-and-match methodology is common among the current generation of plagiarists.

    But all this has little to do with El Naschie. The lesson that El-Nabulsi learned since 2003 was to try to avoid detection by readers or the original authors by staying in obscure venues. So he effectively learned to copy in part from articles that refer to El Naschie because:
    a) nobody reads those articles
    b) authors of those articles don't read other articles
    This works in the short-term, but of course he ignores the existence of full-text search engines in the long term.

    It is also not surprising that there are fringe journals where such incoherent mix-and-match articles slip through referees and editors. But there is also a handful of legitimate journals in the publication list, with texts easily confirmed to be plagiarized, so those journal editors should be notified.

    12 in the past year mean he is stepping up his output and getting more brazen (in that regard he is similar to the primary El N, but unlikely to become his own journal editor). In his articles he claims affiliation to Cheju National University, South Korea, but he is not mentioned anywhere on the website of that University, so that may be exaggerated or fabricated (another El N calling card). It is scandalous that he shows up as having attended various conferences and schools as a student in the past few years, but the organizers are not set up to detect people with pretend credentials and plagiarized publication records.

    ReplyDelete
  23. > contain identical passages

    Actually part of the point is that they're not identical, note the light editing of first and last sentences. But this misses the broader point anyway: plug a text fragment from virtually any paragraph of any of El-Nabulsi's 43 articles since 2005 into your favorite search engine and you'll find the paragraph from elsewhere from which it was lifted. This mix-and-match methodology is common among the current generation of plagiarists.

    But all this has little to do with El Naschie. The lesson that El-Nabulsi learned since 2003 was to try to avoid detection by readers or the original authors by staying in obscure venues. So he effectively learned to copy in part from articles that refer to El Naschie because:
    a) nobody reads those articles
    b) authors of those articles don't read other articles
    This works in the short-term, but of course he ignores the existence of full-text search engines in the long term.

    It is also not surprising that there are fringe journals where such incoherent mix-and-match articles slip through referees and editors. But there is also a handful of legitimate journals in the publication list, with texts easily confirmed to be plagiarized, so those journal editors should be notified.

    12 in the past year mean he is stepping up his output and getting more brazen (in that regard he is similar to the primary El N, but unlikely to become his own journal editor). In his articles he claims affiliation to Cheju National University, South Korea, but he is not mentioned anywhere on the website of that University, so that may be exaggerated or fabricated (another El N calling card). It is scandalous that he shows up as having attended various conferences and schools as a student in the past few years, but the organizers are not set up to detect people with pretend credentials and plagiarized publication records.

    > jumped the gun

    ReplyDelete
  24. > ... contain identical passages

    Part of the point is they're not identical, note light editing of first and last sentences. But this misses the broader point anyway: search google for a text fragment from virtually any paragraph of any of El-Nabulsi's 43 articles since 2005 and you'll find the paragraph from elsewhere from which it was lifted. This mix-and-match methodology is common among the current generation of plagiarists.

    But all this has little to do with El Naschie. The lesson that El-Nabulsi learned since 2003 was to try to avoid detection by readers or the original authors by staying in obscure venues. So he effectively learned to copy in part from articles that refer to El Naschie because:
    a) nobody reads those articles
    b) authors of those articles don't read other articles
    This works in the short-term, but of course he ignores the existence of full-text search engines in the long term.

    It is also not surprising that there are fringe journals where such incoherent mix-and-match articles slip through referees and editors. But there is also a handful of legitimate journals in the publication list, with texts easily confirmed to be plagiarized, so those journal editors should be notified.

    12 in the past year mean he is stepping up his output and getting more brazen (in that regard he is similar to the primary El N, but unlikely to become his own journal editor). In his articles he claims affiliation to Cheju National University, South Korea, but he is not mentioned anywhere on the website of that University, so that may be exaggerated or fabricated (another El N calling card). It is scandalous that he shows up as having attended various conferences and schools as a student in the past few years, but the organizers are not set up to detect people with pretend credentials and plagiarized publication records.

    ReplyDelete
  25. I saw your comment appear, and in fact I updated the text of the post to reflect your correction. Then I refreshed the page and your comment was gone!!! My guess is that it's being rejected for being too long. Try breaking it in two.

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  26. The light editing of first and last sentences misses the broader point anyway: search google for a text fragment from virtually any paragraph of any of El-Nabulsi's 43 articles since 2005 and you'll find the paragraph from elsewhere from which it was lifted. This mix-and-match methodology is common among the current generation of plagiarists.

    But all this has little to do with El Naschie. The lesson that El-Nabulsi learned since 2003 was to try to avoid detection by readers or the original authors by staying in obscure venues. So he effectively learned to copy in part from articles that refer to El Naschie because:
    a) nobody reads those articles
    b) authors of those articles don't read other articles
    This works in the short-term, but of course he ignores the existence of full-text search engines in the long term.

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  27. The light editing misses the broader point anyway: search google for a text fragment from virtually any paragraph of any of El-Nabulsi's 43 articles since 2005 and you'll find the paragraph from elsewhere from which it was lifted. This mix-and-match methodology is common among the current generation of plagiarists.

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  28. But all this has little to do with El Naschie. The lesson that El-Nabulsi learned since 2003 was to try to avoid detection by readers or the original authors by staying in obscure venues. So he effectively learned to copy in part from articles that refer to El Naschie because:
    a) nobody reads those articles
    b) authors of those articles don't read other articles
    This works in the short-term, but of course he ignores the existence of full-text search engines in the long term.

    It is also not surprising that there are fringe journals where such incoherent mix-and-match articles slip through referees and editors. But there is also a handful of legitimate journals in the publication list, with texts easily confirmed to be plagiarized, so those journal editors should be notified.

    12 in the past year mean he is stepping up his output and getting more brazen (in that regard he is similar to the primary El N, but unlikely to become his own journal editor). In his articles he claims affiliation to Cheju National University, South Korea, but he is not mentioned anywhere on the website of that University, so that may be exaggerated or fabricated (another El N calling card). It is scandalous that he shows up as having attended various conferences and schools as a student in the past few years, but the organizers are not set up to detect people with pretend credentials and plagiarized publication records.

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  29. Breaking it in two worked :)

    I like the plagiarism site you linked. I never noticed it before because El Naschie, whatever other faults he has, isn't a plagiarist.

    The El-Nabulsi affair raises the question of how referees see themselves. There is a relaxed approach in which the referee assumes good faith on the part of the submitter. The referee in this case sees his job as finding honest mistakes. On the other hand there is an adversarial model in which the referee initially assumes the submitter may be a fraudster or plagiarist. My impression is that the relaxed model is the default. If journals want the adversarial approach to be the default, so that El-Nabulsi and his ilk don't get published so often, maybe referees should be paid.

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  30. This page is getting a lot of hits suddenly. No idea why.

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  31. Hi Fabien,

    A.R. El-Nabulsi found a home in the Indian Jornal of Physics where placed no less that 7 of his new "discoveries". You may want to have a word with the Editor in Chief, A. Gosh:

    http://link.springer.com/search?query=El+Nabulsi&search-within=Journal&facet-publication-title=Indian+Journal+of+Physics

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  32. ZNA conned by another "pearl" from El-Nabulsi:

    http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/zna.ahead-of-print/zna-2016-0226/zna-2016-0226.xml?format=INT

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  33. Actually, el Nabulsi has managed to place a lot of his "masterpieces" on ZNA:

    http://www.degruyter.com/search?f_0=author&q_0=Nabulsi&searchTitles=false

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