Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Why do physicists ignore Mohamed El Naschie?

Because he's an Arab.


I think that's the gist, but Google Translate works so badly on anything except perfect modern standard Arabic that it's hard to tell. Original Arabic or Google's English.


Related post:


Translate English to Arabic
محمد النشائى El Naschie Watch محمد النشائي El Naschie News محمد النشائى محمد النشائي All El Naschie All The Time محمد النشائى
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15 comments:

  1. El Naschie's Rosa Al-Youssef column is up for Thursday, October 21. Review in the science of nature. Original Arabic or Google's English translation.

    Einstein was primarily an engineer, El Naschie says, subtly drawing a parallel with himself.

    El Naschie tells us that Garnett Ord and Laurent Nottale did work that laid the groundwork for his own, but that El Naschie was the first to recognize the importance of the golden section and Cantor sets. He calls Nottale "a French astronomer famous for his achievements in cosmology". Ord is a member of the E-infinity group.

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  2. I think El naschie is considering Rosa Al-Youssef journal as a substitute for CSF. He can publish in Rosa Al-Youssef journal whatever he likes about his scientific achievement.

    I'm afraid that Rosa Al-Youssef organization could get a score in THE ranking or maybe Shanghai ranking due to those marvelous El naschie's columns.!!!!!!!!!

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  3. Hahahahaha. Rosa needs an Impact Factor.

    Yes, you're right. Lately it's all bragging about his scientific achievements and very little politics.

    He is very undisciplined in his writing, and I am surprised the Rosa editor lets him get away with it. His first few columns were self-contained, but nowadays each story/theme is several columns long; and requires more installments than he promises at the outset. And the sheer amount of name-dropping is embarrassing. It's 30% of what he writes.

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  4. I think El naschie, first, can bundle Rosa Al-Youssef journal journal with Elsevier journals, and after then including it in ISI.

    The rest of the game is just a self-citation and asking J. Huan He to mutually cite him. At the end of the day, Rosa Al-Youssef organization would be a head of Harvard university in THE ranking for impact of research.!!!!!!!!

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  5. El Naschie's Rosa Al-Youssef column is up for Friday, October 22. Engineering without points. Original Arabic or Google's English translation.

    More name-dropping and false modesty. He praises Nottale, Ord, Menger, Feynman, Connes, Cantor and von Neumann. He says Ord has no professional jealousy and rejoices in the victories of scientific colleagues as if they were his own. El Naschie regrets that there isn't room in the column to thank all those who deserve to be thanked.

    I am not sure about this:

    كان الدكتور أورد تلميذ العالم الأسطورة ريتشارد فينمان الحائز علي جائزة نوبل وقد أعطاني صوراً من كثير من خطابات ومراسلات علمية بينه وبين «فينمان» وهو ما أفادني إفادة كبيرة في أعمالي.

    I think he may be saying that a pupil of his showed him letters from Nobel Laureate Richard Feynman -- praising El Naschie's work! Can anyone confirm that? If so, that outlandish revelation requires its own post.

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  6. He says that Ord was a student of Feynman and that Ord showed him (the douche) letters between him (Ord) and Feynman. The douche said that he benefited tremendously from readers those letters.

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  7. Ahaaa! Thank you. It is as I have said before. Deceased prominent people everywhere are in danger of having positively influenced the great man -- even if they haven't met him, as in this case.

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  8. Is it possible that Ord was somehow connected to Feynman (not just in the sense of putting him in the titles of the papers or citing him)?

    I've checked the Guide to the Papers of Richard Phillips Feynman, 1933-1988 and found an interesting record among "O misc":

    [ Box 27 ]
    Ord, Garnet 1982

    It would be interesting to know what this record/paper is about.

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  9. The year of publication isn't the same. I'm really curious what is really about. Maybe someone who has access to the Caltech archive could enlighten us. :)

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  10. Google scholar with Author = "G Ord" and dates 1978 - 1985 returns 33 results. Looking them over to manually discard other Ords leaves only these seven:

    http://iopscience.iop.org/0305-4470/16/9/012

    http://iopscience.iop.org/0305-4470/13/9/006

    http://iopscience.iop.org/0305-4470/15/1/006

    http://iopscience.iop.org/0305-4470/17/16/020

    http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1983PhDT........34O

    http://iopscience.iop.org/0305-4470/18/14/029

    http://iopscience.iop.org/0305-4470/18/15/008

    All are Garnet Ord's, but the last six are all about percolation and lattices -- completely unrelated work stemming from his PhD thesis. The first one is the only one it could be. It's true it says 1983, not 1982. But Feynman could have an early version or preprint. That's likely, if Ord was his student.

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  11. It may be that Ord was not a student of Feynman but just a correspondent. (El Naschie says Ord showed him letters from Feynman.)

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  12. It could be. It's a pity the archive doesn't include the titles.

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  13. http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-abs_connect?return_req=no_params&author=Ord,%20Garnet%20Norman&db_key=PHY

    This is a more complete list of Ord's papers. The one I singled out (number 39 on this list) is the only thing Feynman could conceivably have been interested in, in the vicinity of 1982. And probably Feynman wasn't interested, but just politely wrote back to Ord to thank him, and filed the paper on his shelf, never to look at it again. One of 39 linear feet of papers in his archives.

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  14. Ord was not a student of Feynman.
    His PhD thesis was at the Univ of Toronto in 1983
    and #40 on your list is his phd thesis, Dept of Chemistry, "Lattice Decorations and Percolation Theory" (no full text available).
    Likely his advisor was Stu Whittington, a perfectly legit theoretical chemist who continues to work on statistical mechanics of lattice models.

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